DejaVu-a

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Deja Vu

Many dreamers say they find a connection between a place they dream of – especially a house – and a place they later see while awake. Most of these description appear to be attempts to find connections obvious to no one but the dreamer. A strong desire to have the inner world connect with the real world seems to be the motivation. This may be through a need for human life to have meaning and connection with a wider, invisible, life. The evidence of thousands of dreams suggests that searching for meaning in this direction is misplaced. Meaning arises from a love or acceptance of the many aspects of oneself, and thus the expansion of awareness into what was unconscious.

Deja-vu literally means seen before. The valid cases of it are rare. Nevertheless people do have dreams and experiences in which they can demonstrate they have been to a place before, yet not physically. The most common explanation is that of reincarnation. The Bralorne’s for instance, on tour to India, stepped off their tour boat into Bombay for the first time. Within minutes Mr. Bralorne knew what street they would shortly arrive at, giving its name. This continued, until he had a memory of a house that he thought should be at the foot of Malabar Hill with a big banyan tree in front of it. The couple asked a policeman if such a house existed. He said such a house had been on that very spot. His father had been a servant in the house, and it had belonged to the Bhan family. This really amazed the Bralorne’s, as they had called their son Bhan Bralorne.

“The strongest pathological association of déjà vu is with temporal lobe epilepsy. This correlation has led some researchers to speculate that the experience of déjà vu is possibly a neurological anomaly related to improper electrical discharge in the brain. As most people suffer a mild epileptic episode regularly (e.g. a hypnagogic jerk, the sudden “jolt” that frequently, but not always, occurs just prior to falling asleep), it is conjectured that a similar neurological aberration occurs in the experience of déjà vu, resulting in an erroneous sensation of memory.” – Wikipedia

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