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I Died – But I’m Alive – Superminds 15

When young Debbie N. was dying in hospital, she suddenly started saying to the nurses that her brother had come to meet her and he was telling her not to be afraid of death. The strange thing was that Debbie had never been told she had a brother who had died. Her parents were amazed when they knew what Debbie had said. They had kept their son’s death a secret.

Debbie had looked through the door of death as it opened to receive her. But some people pass through the door and come back to tell us what it was like.

Sam was a baby when his mother died.[1] He was still only four when something tragic and wonderful happened to him. He was playing with other boys near a mill-stream. As he was in the water, one of his friends pushed him into deeper water just as the mill-gates opened. Sam was dragged under by the flood and drowned. Other boys ran for help and Sam was pulled out, apparently dead.

Visiting the world of the dead

After tense minutes of resuscitation however, Sam breathed again. His father carried him home, and in his arms Sam excitedly told his father that something amazing had happened to him in the water. Sam said he felt himself dragged down into the water and everything went black and he seemed to sink further and further. Then he felt a change and experienced a rising feeling of floating upwards. Gradually it got lighter and he surface above the water in the waves of a great sea. Other people were surfacing too, and they were all carried toward the shore where people were waiting for them. As he got near the beach he saw his grandmother and grandfather waving to him. In front of them stood his mother, so pleased to see him. She bent down to lift him out of the water, catching hold of his arms. As she did so a cross she was wearing around her neck swung down in front of Sam’s face, and sparkling on the cross Sam saw seven jewels. Just at that moment Sam felt himself dragged back, down into the darkness again, and when he came out of the darkness he was on the river bank, and his father carried him home.

As he told this story, Sam’s father was very quiet, and never commented. It was only years later that he told Sam something he had kept as a precious secret. Sam’s mother had died suddenly just on her birthday. Before this Sam’s father had saved and bought a special present for her of a cross with seven jewels in it. It had been a surprise, and Sam’s father, telling nobody, opened his wife’s coffin one night before the burial, and with love placed the cross around her neck.. So when Sam told him about the cross, he was so ready to cry he had not said anything to Sam.

Leaving your body behind

Many children and adults have what is called a ‘near-death-experience’ or NDE. This may occur while they are ill, or due to an accident. For instance 11-year-old Brad Steiger was caught in the blades of a large piece of machinery on his parents farm in Iowa. He suffered several skull fractures as the metal blades hit his head. While on this borderline state between life and death, Brad felt himself drift away from his body and was able to watch what was happening from a distance. He could see his injured body on the ground, and saw his sister run for help. He could both watch his father carrying him, and feel something of the sensations of being in his father’s arms all at the same time. While out of the body he also became aware of knowledge beyond his usual ability, being able to see the patterns or processes in life. Although young, he felt he had been shown a plan of the universe and people’s life in it. He wanted to tell people that we are all part of eternal life, and are not alone in the universe.

When people experience being out of their body they are able to do and know things they are not usually capable of. When I was 18 and living in Germany, I had such an experience, and was able to see what my mother was doing in London. But a fascinating example of this appeared in the newspaper The Scotsman of February 27th, 1937. It reported a talk given by Sir Aukland Geddes, MD, to a meeting of the Royal Medical Society in Edinburgh. He described the case of a doctor friend who late at night was suddenly ill with acute gastro-enteritis. At ten o’clock the doctor had tried to ring for help, but found himself unable to move. Gradually he felt as if he were being split in two. One part was outside, and distinct from his body, the other still existing as the self in his body. The awareness outside his body grew stronger though, and the body consciousness disappeared. He was dying from his illness, and could watch his body from a distance. Then he began to realise he could not only see his body, but any other person or place he thought of or concentrated on, whether in London, Scotland, or anywhere. Whoever he thought of he could instantly be with and see what they were doing and knew what they were thinking.

Someone came into the room where his sick body was dying. He could witness that person running to the telephone to call a doctor, and the doctor answering on the distant telephone. Watching his own body and the body of those people he saw, it appeared to him that the brain was like a receiver not only of impressions from the three dimensional world our body exists in, but also from dimensions beyond that. So the mind was not in the brain, but the brain was in the midst of the mind, like a radio is within radio signals.

The brain is a radio set in an ocean of mind

Near death experiences suggest that our awareness can at times reach far beyond the limitations of our seeing, hearing and feeling. We live in a universe in which our mind is still a largely unknown territory. Scientifically we have travelled further within our solar system to map and understand it, than we have within the huge space of the human mind.

Perhaps yours will be the adventure and wonder of helping chart those infinite spaces of mind.

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[1] I have given fictitious names to Debbie and Sam, but they are real people.

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